Humility

For somewhere to belong
A virtue of the humanly
For somewhere to belong

Not arrogance

"Humility is a virtue of the heavenly, not arrogance. Are we the most superior beast on earth? No, not in strength and not in intelligence. It is very arrogant to assume that we are the most intelligent species when we keep repeating the same mistakes over and over again. Both rats and monkeys have been shown to learn from error, yet we have not. More people have died in the name of religion than any other cause on earth. Is massacring God's creations really serving God – or the devil? And what father would want to see his children constantly divided and fighting? What God would allow a single human life to be sacrificed for monetary gain? Again, the Creator or the devil?" ― Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

Fables should be taught as fables, myths as myths, and miracles as poetic fancies. To teach superstitions as truths is a most terrible thing. The child mind accepts and believes them, and only through great pain and perhaps tragedy can he be in after years relieved of them. In fact, men will fight for a superstition quite as quickly as for a living truth — often more so, since a superstition is so intangible you cannot get at it to refute it, but truth is a point of view, and so is changeable." ― Hypathia of Alexandria

"Centuries of fighting, and for what? I say. "Today it ends. I can't live in fear any longer. I've cursed this power. I've both enjoyed and misused it. And I've hidden it away. Now I must try to wield it correctly, to marry it to a purpose and hope that is enough." ― Libba Bray, The Sweet Far Thing

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For somewhere to belong

Screen:

Features:

Being bigwith wonder

How can I tell a story we already know too well?

Her name was Africa. His was France. He colonized her, exploited her, silenced her, and even decades after it was supposed to have ended, still acted with a high hand in resolving her affairs in places like Côte d'Ivoire, a name she had been given because of her export products, not her own identity. Her name was Asia. His was Europe. Her name was silence. His was power. Her name was poverty. His was wealth. Her name was Her, but what was hers? His name was His, and he presumed everything was his, including her, and he thought be could take her without asking and without consequences. It was a very old story, though its outcome had been changing a little in recent decades. And this time around the consequences are shaking a lot of foundations, all of which clearly needed shaking. Who would ever write a fable as obvious, as heavy-handed as the story we've been given? ... His name was privilege, but hers was possibility. His was the same old story, but hers was a new one about the possibility of changing a story that remains unfinished, that includes all of us, that matters so much, that we will watch but also make and tell in the weeks, months, years, decades to come." ― Rebecca Solnit, Men Explain Things to Me

"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder." ― Thomas Aquinas

For somewhere to belong

Noisy desperation

"‎They are angry with me, because I know what I am." Said the little eagle. "How do you know that they are angry with you?" "Because, they despise me for wanting to soar, they only want me to peck at the dirt, looking for ants, with them. But I can't do that. I don't have chicken feet, I have eagle wings." "And what is so wrong with having eagle wings and no chicken feet?" Asked the old owl. "I'm not sure, that's what I'm trying to find out." "They hate you because you know that you are an eagle and they want you to think you are a chicken so that you will peck at the ground looking for ants and worms, so that you will never know that you are an eagle and always think yourself a chicken. Let them hate you, they will always be chickens, and you will always be an eagle. You must fly. You must soar." Said the old owl." ― C. JoyBell C.

"A foolish friend may cause more woe Than could, indeed, the wisest foe." ― Jean de La Fontaine

"You can find in a text whatever you bring, if you will stand between it and the mirror of you imagination. You may not see your ears, but they will be there." ― Mark Twain, The Celebrated Jumping Frog and Other Stories

"Outbreaks of unvarnished truths in the backyard of our true self can be very precious and inspiring, even though we might inconsistently be tempted to give in to the exhilarating perfume of fables and fairy tales or to flattering praise and fiction. ("The day the mirror was talking back")" ― Erik Pevernagie

". . . the mysteries, on belief in which theology would hang the destinies of mankind, are cunningly devised fables whose origin and growth are traceable to the age of Ignorance, the mother of credulity." ― Edward Clodd

"One day', he said, 'the King of the Butterflies sent an emissary to discover the nature of fire. Some time later the emissary returned, saying that he had discovered fire, that he had found it a volatile, enraged substance, and that he had been too afraid to get any closer. So a second emissary set off, who soon returned exhausted, half mad, his wings singed, but the King was still not satisfied and sent his own son off, telling him not to return until he had discovered what fire really is. The son set off, but never returned. The King was satisfied — his son had discovered the true nature of fire." ― José Eduardo Agualusa, Nação Crioula