The substance of silence
Splendid, wondrous, sublime
Splendid, wondrous, sublime
Brooding peace
Brooding peace
Brooding peace
Anything we fully do is an alone journey .
Splendid, wondrous, sublime

"Today, find a point of stillness: brief, but precious slight, but full small, but luminously real. Find a point stillness in the balance of all things between the breathing out and breathing in." ― Na'ama Yehuda

"There is a third choice besides being busy and killing time, something profound." ― James Rozoff

"[T]he light of oneness is available to all of us, present in hidden aquifers where life's waters continue to flow, waiting in a living silence for us to notice." ― Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, For Love of the Real: A Story of Life's Mystical Secret

"The more a person knows the less they talk. I shall cease speaking and endeavor to instill a large band of silence inside myself in order to forge a deeper and closer relationship with all of nature. Only when I attain absolute quietude shall I understand the supreme virtue of humanity and understand the meaning of both life and death. Only when I achieve absolute stillness shall I come to a perfect realization of the meaning of existence innate in all things." ― Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls "Each of us encounters many diverse experiences that make us grow and transform, but we seek to return to our roots, which is quietude." ― Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

"There would never be a way for me to live comfortably with people. Maybe I'd become a monk. I'd pretend to believe in God and live in a cubicle, play an organ and stay drunk on wine. Nobody would fuck with me. I could go into a cell for months of meditation where I wouldn't have to look at anybody and they could just send in the wine." ― Charles Bukowski, Ham on Rye "The best adventures are embarked on alone." ― Lidia Longorio, Hey Human

"I don't hate my relatives or those whose names fill my address book. But I do not want to have lunch with any of them. It is not personal. I am not angry. Nor is this about being afraid. I am not shy. I do not have terrible manners. Do birds hate lips? Do Fijians detest snowplows? Being a loner is not about hate, but need: We need what others dread. We dread what others need." ― Anneli Rufus, Party of One: The Loners' Manifesto

"He even got up once in English class and read an essay called 'The Value of Friendship' and while he was reading it he kept glancing at me. It was a stupid essay, soft and standard, but the class applauded when he finished, and I thought, well, that's what people think and what can you do about it? I wrote a counter-essay called, 'The Value of No Friendship At All.' The teacher didn't let me read it to the class. She gave me a D." ― Charles Bukowski, Ham on Rye

"We have so little in common, but we were both avid readers growing up. I read almost nonstop when I was little, and it saved me in school. I hated classes, hated teachers. They always wanted me to do things I didn't want to do. But because I was a reader, they knew I wasn't stupid, just different. They cut me slack. It got me through. Reading couldn't help me make friends, though. I never got the hang of it. I would talk to kids, and over the years a handful of them even seemed to like me enough to ask to come over, but after that first visit to the house they never lasted. Ma told me what I did wrong but I could never manage to do it right. 'Act interested in what they say,' she said, but they never said anything interesting. 'Don't talk too much,' she said, but it never seemed like too much to me. So it wasn't like people threw tomatoes at me, or dipped my pigtails in inkwells, or stood up to move their desks away from mine, but I never really managed to make friends that I could keep. And I got used to it. I got used to a lot of things. Writing extra papers to make up for falling short in class participation. Volunteering to do the planning and the typing up whenever we had group work assigned, because I knew I could never really work right with a group. And the coping always worked. Up until three years into college, where despite Ma's repeated demands to try harder, I stalled. Every semester since, I was always still trying to finish that last Oral Communications class, which I had repeatedly failed. This semester I only made it six weeks in before it became obvious I wouldn't pass. I think we'd both finally given up." ― Jael McHenry, The Kitchen Daughter

"In a matter of speaking. I am an X-man. I am different from most people, I stand out in the crowd, and I don't like being judged for it" ― Dean Mackin

"He was somewhat of a loner by temperament--because though never wholly happy when alone, he was usually slightly more miserable when with other people." ― Colin Dexter, The Wench is D

"It is impossible to ostracize a lone wolf." ― Joseph Annaruma

Obstinate loner

"He was a good, even a shining light as a Castalian to the extent that he had a many-sided mind, tirelessly active in scholarship as well as in the art of the Glass Bead Game, and enormously hard-working; but in character, in his attitude toward the hierarchy and the morality of the Order he was a very mediocre, not to say bad Castalian. The greatest of his vices was a persistent neglect of meditation, which he refused to take seriously. The purpose of meditation, after all, is adaptation of the individual to the hierarchy, and application in it might very well have cured him of his neurasthenia. For it infallibly helped him whenever, after a period of bad conduct, excessive excitement, or melancholia, his superiors disciplined him by prescribing strict meditation exercises under supervision. Even Knecht, kindly disposed and forgiving though he was, frequently had to resort to this measure. There was no question about it: Tegularius was a willful, moody person who refused to fit into his society. Every so often he would display the liveliness of his intellect. When highly stimulated he could be entrancing; his mordant wit sparkled and he overwhelmed everyone with the audacity and richness of his sometimes somber inspirations. But basically he was incurable, for he did not want to be cured; he cared nothing for co-ordination and a place in the scheme of things. He loved nothing but his freedom, his perpetual student status, and preferred spending his whole life as the unpredictable and obstinate loner, the gifted fool and nihilist, to following the path of subordination to the hierarchy and thus attaining peace. He cared nothing for peace, had no regard for the hierarchy, hardly minded reproof and isolation. Certainly he was a most inconvenient and indigestible component in a community whose idea was harmony and orderliness. But because of this very troublesomeness and indigestiblity he was, in the midst of such a limpid and prearranged little world, a constant source of vital unrest, a reproach, an admonition and warning, a spur to new, bold, forbidden, intrepid ideas, an unruly, stubborn sheep in the herd. And, to our mind, this was the very reason his friend cherished him." ― Hermann Hesse, The Glass Bead Game

"There are times i wish i was a master magician so i could disappear into the folds of time, without consequence, without missing a beat. As an introvert, i need so much time to myself. I feel expansive and peaceful in my own space, constricted and chained, when confined to social situations. I can't blossom when pressed against everyone else." ― Jaeda DeWalt

"Today, find a point of stillness: brief, but precious slight, but full small, but luminously real. Find a point stillness in the balance of all things between the breathing out and breathing in." ― Na'ama Yehuda

"I look out my window a lot. ​It's just one of those things that keeps me grounded in this weird, one-with-nature kind of way. I hate curtains. They only gather dust. And I hate alarms even more. I enjoy the natural light to whisper across my face in the morning with gentle fingers, not some man-made sound that jars me into life with a harsh slap. It is the quiet moments of the morning that I savor most, in bed, looking out my window. It's when I write my best work."

R.B. O'Brien

There is a third choice besides being busy and killing time, something profound."

James Rozoff

The more a person knows the less they talk. I shall cease speaking and endeavor to instill a large band of silence inside myself in order to forge a deeper and closer relationship with all of nature. Only when I attain absolute quietude shall I understand the supreme virtue of humanity and understand the meaning of both life and death. Only when I achieve absolute stillness shall I come to a perfect realization of the meaning of existence innate in all things."

Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

"Consciousness is an evolutionary step in human life that must never cease transforming individual persons and the species as a whole. Perchance by using cognitive thought processes to eliminate aguish, reduce fear, and control personal desires, I will learn to follow a path of balance, avoid extremism, and someday attain a state of mental quietude. I aspire to live simply, strive for humility and peacefulness, and not allow prior failures or other people's perceptions to intimidate me from developing into my truest being. I need to exhibit curiosity, willingly experiment, create dangerously, and steadfastly seek authenticity and spiritual enlightenment. I cannot allow prior failures or disgraceful stumbles to deter me from metamorphosing into the final manifestation of my being. A hidden aspect of my nature patiently waits unveiling by the interactive duality of the conscious and unconscious mind as my physical body marches through time." ― Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrol

"Whereas the beautiful is limited, the sublime is limitless, so that the mind in the presence of the sublime, attempting to imagine what it cannot, has pain in the failure but pleasure in contemplating the immensity of the attempt" ― Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason

"Think of my Pleasure in Solitude, in comparison of my commerce with the world - there I am a child - there they do not know me not even my most intimate acquaintance - I give into their feelings as though I were refraining from irritating a little child - Some think me middling, others silly, other foolish - every one thinks he sees my weak side against my will; when in thruth it is with my will - I am content to be thought all this because I have in my own breast so graet a resource. This is one great reason why they like me so; because they can all show to advantage in a room, and eclipese from a certain tact one who is reckoned to be a good Poet - I hope I am not here playing tricks 'to make the angels weep': I think not: for I have not the least contempt for my species; and though it may sound paradoxical: my greatest elevations of Soul leave me every time more humbled - Enough of this - though in your Love for me you will not think it enough." ― John Keats

"The sublime state of peace of mind, despite our woundedness, emits a sense of comfort and gentleness to others, an inner charm that calms an anxious soul amid our benevolent presence, like a wild deer that drinks water from the serenity of the forest, and then leaves as quietly as it arrives fully quenched from its thirst. (— Danny Castillones Sillada, The Quietude of the Soul)" ― Danny Castillones Sillada

We all live in the sublime. Where else can we live? That is the only place of life." ― Maurice Maeterlinck, The Treasure of the humble>h1 for the document title, p with class subtitle for the document subtitle, h2 for section headings, and h3 for low-level headings. More specific headings are not supported. If you feel the urge to reach for a heading of level 4 or greater, consider redesigning your document:

"Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain, and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling .... When danger or pain press too nearly, they are incapable of giving any delight, and [yet] with certain modifications, they may be, and they are delightful, as we every day experience."

Edmund Burke, A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful

"For thousands of years, it had been nature--and its supposed creator--that had had a monopoly on awe. It had been the icecaps, the deserts, the volcanoes and the glaciers that had given us a sense of finitude and limitation and had elicited a feeling in which fear and respect coagulated into a strangely pleasing feeling of humility, a feeling which the philosophers of the eighteenth century had famously termed the sublime. But then had come a transformation to which we were still the heirs.... Over the course of the nineteenth century, the dominant catalyst for that feeling of the sublime had ceased to be nature. We were now deep in the era of the technological sublime, when awe could most powerfully be invoked not by forests or icebergs but by supercomputers, rockets and particle accelerators. We were now almost exclusively amazed by ourselves." ― Alain de Botton, The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work

"It is the horrible texture of a fabric that should be woven of ships' cables and hawsers. A Polar wind blows through it, and birds of prey hover over it." ― Herman Melville "A shaft of sweetness shoots through me from top to toe when the sun rises; I shoulder my gun in silent exaltation." ― Knut Hamsun, Pan "What give all that is tragic, whatever its form, the characteristic of the sublime, is the first inkling of the knowledge that the world and life can give no satisfaction, and are not worth our investment in them. The tragic spirit consists in this. Accordingly it leads to resignation." ― Arthur Schopenhauer, The World as Will and Representation, Vol. 1

Splendid, wondrous, sublime

"Always respect imaginary friends. They're on twenty-four hour call, and you're not." ― Helen Christie, Special Needs